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A Survey of Reuse Prologues
Lombard Hill Group Report No: AP-12000

This survey identifies twelve reuse prologues developed by both the private and public sectors. A prologue is a description of the information elements included with each software component.

A Survey of Reuse Economic Models
Lombard Hill Group Report No: AP-12001

This report baselines reuse economic modeling by surveying and comparing seventeen economic models and presenting conclusions and recommendations for further research. Each model is described in its original terminology and translated using a common lexicon. The analyses indicate a great deal of commonality among the set of models. While this may indicate that researchers are arriving at similar models independently, it may also suggest that we should direct our efforts at forging new ground in reuse economics. Five areas for further research in reuse economics are recommended, and general guidelines for helping organizations decide on a suitable economic model are discussed. The 'Reuse Cost Calculator' spreadsheet that is now being bundled with the report was developed by the Data and Analysis Center for Software (DACS) (www.thedacs.com) as part of their Gold Practices Initiative. The DACS is a DoD-sponsored Information Analysis Center (IAC) administratively managed by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). The DACS is technically managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) in Rome, NY and operated by ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences. For more information or to order, please contact products@lombardhill.com



Managing Software Reuse
ISBN 0135523737

Your copy may be ordered from amazon.com or a bookstore near you.

Managing Software Reuse is a comprehensive, step-by-step, guidebook to an integrated approach for investigating, planning, and implementing software reuse. With the reuse potential and aptitude model, the author shows when reuse should not be implemented in an organization and illustrates the case with reuse failures. He introduces the forward-thinking concept of Strategy-driven reuse, the deliberate choice and implementation of reuse for gaining competitive advantage. Examples and data from real-life reuse programs in companies such as Hewlett-Packard, IBM, GTE, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, and First Boston are used to highlight key concepts. A useful outline is provided for the reader to create a reuse infrastructure and implementation plan.

Managing Software Reuse is an invaluable reference and includes the world's most extensive collection of surveys on reuse adoption strategies (eleven strategies), success factors (five studies), economic models (seventeen models), reuse maturity models (seven models), assessments (nine assessments), organizational structures (seven structures), metrics, processes (ten processes), domain analyses approaches (nine approaches), reusability guidelines (nine guidelines), prologues (five prologues), and certification levels (eight examples).

Included in the book is an extensive list and description of companies reusing software in the aerospace, banking, computer and electronic equipment, information systems and business applications, analytical instruments, insurance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications, transportation, and utilities industries.

Managing Software Reuse shows exactly how to:

OUTLINE FOR MANAGING SOFTWARE REUSE:

I. INTRODUCTION
1. THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT CRUNCH
2. SOFTWARE REUSE - DEFINITION, SCOPE AND FRAMEWORK
3. EVOLUTION OF THE SOFTWARE REUSE CONCEPT
4. MAJOR TRENDS IN REUSE
5. REUSE IN INDUSTRY
6. ORGANIZATIONAL REENGINEERING FOR REUSE: A REUSE ADOPTION AND INSTITUTIONALIZATION MODEL
Appendix 6-A: A Survey of Reuse Adoption Strategies

II. INITIATING REUSE
7. THE ROLE OF A CORPORATE REUSE PROGRAM
8. IDENTIFYING REUSE POTENTIAL AND APTITUDE
Appendix 8-A: A Survey of Prior Research on Reuse Success Factors
9. SELECTING PILOT PROJECTS

III. INVESTIGATING REUSE
10. REUSE INVESTIGATION
11. BENEFITS AND COSTS OF SOFTWARE REUSE
12. A COST JUSTIFICATION MODEL FOR SOFTWARE REUSE
Appendix 12-A: A Survey of Reuse Economic Models
13. DECIDING ON REUSE AS A STRATEGY
Appendix 13-A: A Survey of Reuse and Maturity Models
14. CONDUCTING A REUSE ASSESSMENT
Appendix 14-A: A Survey of Reuse Assessments

IV. PLANNING FOR SOFTWARE REUSE
15. A REUSE VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT
16. STAFFING FOR SOFTWARE REUSE
17. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES FOR SOFTWARE REUSE
Appendix 17-A: A Survey of Prior Research on Reuse Organizational Structures
18. FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING FOR A REUSE PROGRAM
19. REUSE METRICS
Appendix 19-A: A Survey of Reuse Metrics
20. MARKETING REUSABLE SOFTWARE
21. LEGAL AND CONTRACTUAL ISSUES OF SOFTWARE REUSE
22. MANUFACTURING REUSABLE SOFTWARE

V. PROCESSES AND TOOLS
23. REUSE PROCESSES
Appendix 23-A: A Survey of Reuse Processes
Appendix 23-B: A Survey of Domain Analysis Approaches
Appendix 23-C: A Survey of Reusability Guidelines
24. REUSE TOOLS
Appendix 24-A: A Survey of Information Elements (Prologues)
Appendix 24-B: A Survey of Certification Levels

VI. IMPLEMENTING SOFTWARE REUSE
25. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

VII. MONITORING AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
26. MONITORING AND CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVING THE REUSE PROGRAM

VIII. FUTURE TRENDS
27. FUTURE TRENDS

APPENDIX A. A REUSE INFRASTRUCTURE AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN OUTLINE
APPENDIX B: SOFTWARE REUSE LEXICON

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